SINKS

We also carry a large selection of stainless steel and porcelain sinks and a full line of Pearl sinks.

Pearl Sinks


Adriatic Granite

Granite - Primarily made of Quartz (35%), Feldspar (45%) and Potassium. Usually has darker colors. Contains very little calcite, if any. Provides a heavy crystalline and granular appearance with mineral grains. It is very hard material and easier to maintain than marble. There are different types of granite depending on the percentage mix of quartz, mica and feldspar.

Adriatic Granite

Marble - A recrystallized limestone that formed when the limestone softened from heat and pressure and recrystallized into marble where mineral changes occurred. The main consistency is calcium and dolomite. Ranges in many colors and is usually heavily veined and shows lots of grains.

Adriatic Granite

Onyx - A form of chalcedony, part of the quartz group. Like the other stones in the chalcedony family, onyx has a smooth, waxy luster. Onyx can be found in a wide range of colors, often layered.

Adriatic Granite

LimeStone - Mainly consists of calcite. It does not show much graining or crystalline structure. It has a smooth granular surface. Varies in hardness. Some dense limestones can be polished. Common colors are black, grey, white, yellow or brown. It is more likely to stain than marble. Limestone is known to contain lime from sea water.

Adriatic Granite

Slate - A fine grained metamorphic stone that formed from clay, sedimentary rock shale, and sometimes quartz. Very thin and can be brittle. Usually black, grey, or green.

Adriatic Granite

Engineered Stone - New engineered materials are actually created through a manufacturing process that mixes approximately 95 percent ground natural quartz with 5 percent polymer resins. The result is a super-hard, low-maintenance, natural stone-look countertop available in an array of colors.

Adriatic Granite

Travertine - Usually a cream or reddish colour. It is formed through the accumulation of calcite from hot springs. It contains lots of holes that were formed from water flowing through the stone. These holes are often filled with synthetic resins or cements.